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Maryland Manual, 1994-95
Volume 186, Preface 11   View pdf image (33K)
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PREFACE

The Maryland Manual, 1994-1995 highlights the General Assembly. As well as providing new
legislative material, this Manual also better defines the Executive and Judicial Branches of State
government and offers new data on local and federal agencies in Maryland.

In the Legislative Branch section, for the first time, the Manual begins to set forth the institutional
history and structure of the State Senate (p. 51) and the House of Delegates (p. 71), and their standing
committees. New legislative election districts also are noted (p. 123).

New to this edition are retrospective budget and personnel summaries covering the past three years
for State government agencies. Under each Constitutional officer and the Secretary of each principal
executive Department are named the many boards and commissions on which they are required to serve
by virtue of their office. Also in the Executive Branch, thanks to Ann J. Baker, this Manual includes
expanded histories of the Department of Juvenile Services (p. 374), and the Department of Public Safety
and Correctional Services (p. 443).

For the Judicial Branch, historical background has been added on the courts, and new sections cover
the Conference of Circuit Judges, the District Court Administrative Judges Committee, and committees
of the Maryland Judicial Conference (p. 607).

When considering Maryland government, we generally think of State government and, indeed, most
of this book describes the State level of government. Yet, Maryland government is the interaction of
federal, State and local governments. In many areas of concern—education, health, and transportation,
for example—public policy decisions are made at all three levels of government and daily affect each of
us. To understand State government we need to know its relation to federal and local governments.

Federal agencies are found not just within the District of Columbia, but in Maryland as well. For this
reason, the Maryland Manual, 1994-1995 encompasses more federal offices in the section on Maryland
and the Federal Government. These include the U.S. Bankruptcy Court, U.S. Magistrate Judges, and the
U.S. Marshal for the District of Maryland (p. 803). Added also is a listing, by county, of Federal Agencies
in Maryland (p. 805) on which Ray F. Lynch labored, and a description of new Congressional election
districts (p. 796).

This Manual edition defines key elements of local government. For the governments of each county
and Baltimore City, organizational charts now appear along with budget and personnel summaries for
the past three years and personnel, addresses, and phones for Administrative Offices, Community Services,
Education, Elections, Health, Judicial Offices, Legal Offices, Liquor Licensing, Planning, and Public
Safety (p. 675). Text notes whether officials or boards are elected or appointed and to whom they are
accountable. The organizational charts, introduced with this edition, highlight four key areas of local
government: administration; community resources; land use and environment; and public safely. Regard-
less of organizational structure, these areas of responsibility are common to each county and Baltimore
City. The improved text on local government is the work of Elizabeth W. Newell and Patricia S. Shaffer.

In State government, we are grateful for the assistance of John R. Stierhoff, Counsel to the President
of the Senate, in making this Manual possible. We also thank those agencies and conscientious public
servants who shared their knowledge and insight for this edition: Patricia E. Joyce, Penny MacAdams,
and Jennifer Mayhew of the Governor's Appointments Office; the staff of the Speaker of the House of
Delegates; Lynda C. Davis, Department of Legislative Reference; the Department of Fiscal Services; Anna
Sakers and Ginger Lambros, General Assembly Mail Room; Alexander L. Cummings, Clerk of the Court
of Appeals; Leslie D. Gradet, Clerk of the Court of Special Appeals; Betty L. Thompson of the District
Court of Maryland; Roxanne P. McKagan, Administrative Office of the Courts; John J. Pirro, Jr.,
Department of Budget and Fiscal Planning; Steve Cassard, Department of General Services; Michael T.
Borkowski, State Administrative Board of Election Laws; and Michel A. Lettre, Office of Planning.

At the State Archives, we appreciate the guidance of State Archivist Edward C. Papenfuse and the help
we received from Lynne MacAdam; Donna R. Hill; Diane Elizabeth (Betsy) Steele; Shirley A. Bodziak;
Teresa M. Fountain; James S. Heffelfinger; Oscar J. Dufrene; Shashi P. Thapar; James T. Bricker; Theresa
Boston; Wilder F. Stewart; and Cecelia C. Smith. Special thanks also go to David M. Williams.

Annapolis, Maryland Diane P. Frese
June 1994 Editor

 

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Maryland Manual, 1994-95
Volume 186, Preface 11   View pdf image (33K)
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