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Session Laws, 1943
Volume 584, Page 1967   View pdf image (33K)
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HERBERT R. O'CONOR, GOVERNOR. 1967

interests define the scope of its favors; the foundation of de-
mocracy is man whose integrity is inviolable and whose wel-
fare is its primary concern. The motivating power of the for-
mer is violence; of the latter, freedom. One feeds upon un-
scrupulous ambition; the other upon an enlightened sense of
obligation;

One or the other of these forces will now triumph and govern
mankind. The present conflict is irrepressible and decisive. It
is the challenge of the ages to the generation of today, and rep-
resents those spiritually cosmic forces which visit the world at
critical periods in human history to shape the destinies of men.
This world cannot remain half-slave, half-free; half-totalitarian,
half-democratic. The laws of civilized society prevent inter-
course between slaves and free men from being either congenial
or profitable. If totalitarianism wins this conflict, the world
will be ruled by tyrants, and individuals will be slaves. If de-
mocracy wins, the nations of the earth will be united in a com-
mon-wealth of free peoples, and individuals, wherever found,
will be the sovereign units of the new world order;

Man has struggled from time immemorial to endow the indi-
vidual with certain fundamental rights whose very existence is
now imperiled. Among those rights is man's freedom to wor-
ship, speak, write, assemble and vote without arbitrary inter-
ference. To safeguard these liberties as a heritage for the hu-
man race, governments were instituted among men, with consti-
tutional guarantees against the despotic exercise of political
authority, such as are provided by elected parliaments, trial by
jury, habeas corpus and due process of law. Man must now
either consolidate his historic rights or lose them for genera-
tions to come;

The ceaseless changes wrought in human society by science,
industry and economics, as well as by the spiritual, social and
intellectual forces which impregnate all cultures, make politi-
cal and geographical isolation of nations hereafter impossible.
The organic life of the human race is at last indissolubly unified
and can never be severed, but it must be politically ordained and
made subject to law. Only a government capable of discharg-
ing all the functions of sovereignty in the executive, legislative
and judicial spheres can accomplish such a task. Civilization
now requires laws, in the place of treaties, as instruments to
regulate commerce between peoples. The intricate conditions of
modern life have rendered treaties ineffectual and obsolete, and
made laws essential and inevitable. The age of treaties is dead;
the age of laws is here;

Governments, limited in their jurisdiction to local geographi-
cal areas, can no longer satisfy the needs or fulfill the obliga-

 

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Session Laws, 1943
Volume 584, Page 1967   View pdf image (33K)
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